Information Systems for Environmental Sustainability

IT, Resource Productivity, Environmental Preservation, and the Fourth Industrial Revolution

C02 Emissions by Economic Sector

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Interesting figure produced by the U.S. EPA:

Using this categorization, emissions from electricity generation accounted for the largest portion (34 percent) of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2007. Transportation activities, in aggregate, accounted for the second largest portion (28 percent). Emissions from industry accounted for about 20 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2007. In contrast to electricity generation and transportation, emissions from industry have in general declined over the past decade. The long-term decline in these emissions has been due to structural changes in the U.S. economy (i.e., shifts from a manufacturing-based to a service-based economy), fuel switching, and efficiency improvements. The remaining 18 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions were contributed by the residential, agriculture, and commercial sectors, plus emissions from U.S. territories. The residential sector accounted for 5 percent, and primarily consisted of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion. Activities related to agriculture accounted for roughly 7 percent of U.S. emissions; unlike other economic sectors, agricultural sector emissions were dominated by N2O emissions from agricultural soil management and CH4 emissions from enteric fermentation, rather than CO2 from fossil fuel combustion. The commercial sector accounted for roughly 6 percent of emissions, while U.S. territories accounted for about 1 percent.

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Author: nigelpm

Associate Professor of Information Systems, Stephen M. Ross School of Business, University of Michigan - Helping organizations to navigate digital transformation.

One thought on “C02 Emissions by Economic Sector

  1. Pingback: Surprise: Energy Industry not Prepared for EPA Emissions Reporting Mandate « Information Systems for Environmental Sustainability

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